Lord Byron: An Uncommon Hero (by Craig Molus)

In this essay I shall attempt to discuss, very briefly, the life of the poet George Gordon Byron, sixth Lord Byron (b. 1788–d. 1824), and his two seminal works: Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and Don Juan along with Hours of Idleness … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 4, by Valentin Boulan)

Chapter Three: On the importance of Group Dynamics Studies about troop motivations have often been subject to a heated two sided debate, concerned by whether broad ideas or group dynamics within regiments themselves played a greater role in galvanising soldiers. … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 3, by Valentin Boulan)

Chapter Two: ‘Dedicated body and soul to the cause they served ’ According to Robben, fighting motivations can be divided into two broad categories: the original motivations to enlist, determined by the pre-war context as discussed in Chapter One, and … Continue reading

Were the famines that hit India in the 19th and 20th centuries the products of British Imperial rule? (by William Miles)

Famines result from changes in weather patterns coupled with poor insurance against crop failures. These two factors are intertwined and neither can be said alone to cause famine. Both factors existed during the nineteenth and twentieth century famines that hit … Continue reading

A Discussion of “The Life of Olaudah Equiano” (by Stephen Basdeo)

The slave trade was abolished throughout the British Empire in 1807. However, it was during the late-eighteenth century that the Abolition movement in Britain gained momentum. In 1772, a judge, Lord Mansfield, had already ruled that slavery in England itself … Continue reading

Accused of Infanticide: Evolution of a Criminal Offence in Popular Culture, 1680-1849 (by Tammy Cairns)

Infanticide has always been a highly emotive crime which draws upon pre-conceived ideas of femininity and maternal instinct. From the early modern period up until today, women accused of this crime have been vilified as unnatural beastly characters, capable of … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 2, by Valentin Boulan)

Chapter One: ‘Aux armes citoyens!’ – Myth or Reality ? The formation of the Revolutionary army was a complex process, which took over a year and several enrolment campaigns to finalise. This progression can be divided into two main stages, … Continue reading

Explanations of Japan’s Imperialistic Expansion, 1894-1910 (by Bill Gordon)

Japan emerged in 1853 from two and a half centuries of self-imposed peaceful isolation, but within a few decades the country’s leaders embarked on a policy of aggressive territorial expansion. During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Western … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 1, by Valentin Boulan)

The Revolutionary Wars, beginning in April 1792 when France declared war on Austria, were an inevitable consequence of the French Revolution, which generated ideas of democracy and individual freedom, threatening the rest of Europe’s autocratic states. Although France would be … Continue reading

How did colonial authority view and control activities between convicts and Aboriginals in Australia during the late 18th and early 19th centuries? (Part 2, by Jack Watt)

Another matter of great concern amongst free settlers was sexual relations between convict men and Aboriginal women. It was unavoidable that such a situation would arise – ‘The gross sexual imbalance among convicts meant that Aboriginal women were desired by … Continue reading