Do memorials serve as true representations of the past? Discuss with reference to at least two Nazi concentration camp memorials (by Adam McNeil)

The Nazi concentration camp symbolises everything that Western liberal ideals oppose, totalitarianism, discrimination, barbarity. Thus when gazing over the vast expanse of the crumbling Auschwitz-Birkenau, partiality is inevitable. However, when governments systematically repress truths, history is twisted through propaganda or … Continue reading

Were the famines that hit India in the 19th and 20th centuries the products of British Imperial rule? (by William Miles)

Famines result from changes in weather patterns coupled with poor insurance against crop failures. These two factors are intertwined and neither can be said alone to cause famine. Both factors existed during the nineteenth and twentieth century famines that hit … Continue reading

To what extent did the populations of rural Lithuania and Poland engage in hostilities and Nazi collaboration against Jewish fugitives and partisans surviving in forests? (Part 1, by Jack Watt)

The forest is a hugely significant, but somewhat marginalised landscape of the Holocaust. Initially woodland was the chosen site of the Einsatzgruppen shooting squads, helping to facilitate the mass murder and disposal of thousands of Jews. However, they later became … Continue reading

A Discussion of “The Life of Olaudah Equiano” (by Stephen Basdeo)

The slave trade was abolished throughout the British Empire in 1807. However, it was during the late-eighteenth century that the Abolition movement in Britain gained momentum. In 1772, a judge, Lord Mansfield, had already ruled that slavery in England itself … Continue reading

From the perspective of British policy makers, was the dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces one over military necessity or over prestige? (Part 2, by Michael Grimshaw)

Evidence that it was really prestige that drove Churchill can be seen as late as January 1954 when he attempted to slow the progress of negotiations with the Egyptians which would result in the withdrawal of troops. It was only … Continue reading

From the perspective of British policy makers, was the dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces one over military necessity or over prestige? (Part 1, by Michael Grimshaw)

The dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces dates as far back as autumn 1945 when Chief of the Imperial General Staff, Alan Brooke, visited Egypt and entered into discussions with King … Continue reading

How can it be explained that Nazism made real, if partial, inroads into wider German Society? (by Joshua Arbury)

It cannot be doubted that Nazi Germany was the most destructive political regime of the 20th century, not only because it unleashed World War II or instigated the holocaust but because of its impact on German society. The extent of … Continue reading

Was the collapse of Christian unity and the emergence of Protestantism inevitable in 1517? (by Valentin Boulan)

In 1517, Martin Luther published his highly controversial Ninety-Five Thesis, which severely challenged the authority of the Church, and would result in the establishment of the Lutheran Church half a decade later. Consequently, 1517 has often been regarded as the … Continue reading

Accused of Infanticide: Evolution of a Criminal Offence in Popular Culture, 1680-1849 (by Tammy Cairns)

Infanticide has always been a highly emotive crime which draws upon pre-conceived ideas of femininity and maternal instinct. From the early modern period up until today, women accused of this crime have been vilified as unnatural beastly characters, capable of … Continue reading