From the perspective of British policy makers, was the dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces one over military necessity or over prestige? (Part 2, by Michael Grimshaw)

Evidence that it was really prestige that drove Churchill can be seen as late as January 1954 when he attempted to slow the progress of negotiations with the Egyptians which would result in the withdrawal of troops. It was only … Continue reading

From the perspective of British policy makers, was the dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces one over military necessity or over prestige? (Part 1, by Michael Grimshaw)

The dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces dates as far back as autumn 1945 when Chief of the Imperial General Staff, Alan Brooke, visited Egypt and entered into discussions with King … Continue reading

An evaluation of Bernard Porter’s observations that ‘… there can be no presumption that Britain – the Britain that stayed at home – was an essentially ‘imperialist’ nation in the 19th and 20th centuries’ (by Tammy Cairns)

During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries it has been argued by a number of new-imperial historians including Antoinette Burton, Catherine Hall and John MacKenzie, that empire was seen and experienced everywhere within British society. Ranging from the high culture … Continue reading

Was the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament a moderate campaign group or a ‘new’ social movement? (by Jack Watt)

The term ‘new social movement’ (henceforth NSM) is a contentious one, describing something never entirely static, quantifiable or tangible. From environmentalism to women’s rights no single NSM fits every criterion ascribed, and one can find neither agreement between academics nor … Continue reading

Evaluation England’s role in opposing Slavery (by Stephen Basdeo)

Before its abolition in the nineteenth century, slavery was extremely profitable for the British, being an ideal source of labour which was suitable for cultivating the commercial wealth of their colonies (Heuman & Walvin, 2003, p.155). Since its abolition, British … Continue reading