How did colonial authority view and control activities between convicts and Aboriginals in Australia during the late 18th and early 19th centuries? (Part 2, by Jack Watt)

Another matter of great concern amongst free settlers was sexual relations between convict men and Aboriginal women. It was unavoidable that such a situation would arise – ‘The gross sexual imbalance among convicts meant that Aboriginal women were desired by … Continue reading

How did colonial authority view and control activities between convicts and Aboriginals in Australia during the late 18th and early 19th centuries? (Part 1, by Jack Watt)

The relationship between indigenous groups and convicts in Australia is somewhat understudied, despite convict experience, and Aboriginal experience, being heavily saturated fields in their own right. Revisionist works on convict transportation and labour studies have focused on issues such as … Continue reading

The Public School Ethos and Late Nineteenth-Century Juvenile Literature (by Stephen Basdeo)

In 1888 a biography entitled The Life of General Gordon was written so that ‘the young can learn the beautiful lessons of obedience and humility, of loyalty to God and devotion to others’ (Hope, 1888, p.361). The writers of biographical … Continue reading

How The Times shaped its coverage of the 1857 Indian Mutiny to support a broader justification of Empire (by Valentin Boulan)

The Indian Mutiny began in May 1857 when the discontent of Sepoys in the Bengali army, sparked by British demands to use rifle cartridges greased with beef and pork fat, which were against both Hindu and Muslim beliefs, escalated into … Continue reading