Lord Byron: An Uncommon Hero (by Craig Molus)

In this essay I shall attempt to discuss, very briefly, the life of the poet George Gordon Byron, sixth Lord Byron (b. 1788–d. 1824), and his two seminal works: Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and Don Juan along with Hours of Idleness … Continue reading

How did Idi Amin Dada lead a successful coup in 1971? (Part 1, by William Miles)

Obote’s actions on the 24th January 1971 set in motion the coup d’etat which was to bring Amin to power. On this evening, Obote, realising that he must contain Amin, called up the officer’s mess at Jinja barracks to order … Continue reading

Did the British government have any intention on giving the Arabs a state of their own after the First World War? (by Mr Charrington)

British policy in the Middle East prior to the outbreak of WWI was certainly complicated; but it has also been misunderstood in historiography. True, reputation was against the British government – the Empire was perhaps at its most powerful, governing … Continue reading

To what extent did the populations of rural Lithuania and Poland engage in hostilities and Nazi collaboration against Jewish fugitives and partisans surviving in forests? (Part 2, by Jack Watt)

Traditional anti-Semitism was rife in pre-war Eastern Europe and was not a recent phenomenon. Yehuda Merin asserts that ‘most of the local population harboured feelings of hatred for the Jews in the family camps… well-rooted in past ages.’ This was … Continue reading

Do memorials serve as true representations of the past? Discuss with reference to at least two Nazi concentration camp memorials (by Adam McNeil)

The Nazi concentration camp symbolises everything that Western liberal ideals oppose, totalitarianism, discrimination, barbarity. Thus when gazing over the vast expanse of the crumbling Auschwitz-Birkenau, partiality is inevitable. However, when governments systematically repress truths, history is twisted through propaganda or … Continue reading

Were the famines that hit India in the 19th and 20th centuries the products of British Imperial rule? (by William Miles)

Famines result from changes in weather patterns coupled with poor insurance against crop failures. These two factors are intertwined and neither can be said alone to cause famine. Both factors existed during the nineteenth and twentieth century famines that hit … Continue reading

To what extent did the populations of rural Lithuania and Poland engage in hostilities and Nazi collaboration against Jewish fugitives and partisans surviving in forests? (Part 1, by Jack Watt)

The forest is a hugely significant, but somewhat marginalised landscape of the Holocaust. Initially woodland was the chosen site of the Einsatzgruppen shooting squads, helping to facilitate the mass murder and disposal of thousands of Jews. However, they later became … Continue reading

A Discussion of “The Life of Olaudah Equiano” (by Stephen Basdeo)

The slave trade was abolished throughout the British Empire in 1807. However, it was during the late-eighteenth century that the Abolition movement in Britain gained momentum. In 1772, a judge, Lord Mansfield, had already ruled that slavery in England itself … Continue reading

From the perspective of British policy makers, was the dispute between the British and Egyptian governments over the peacetime presence of British military forces one over military necessity or over prestige? (Part 2, by Michael Grimshaw)

Evidence that it was really prestige that drove Churchill can be seen as late as January 1954 when he attempted to slow the progress of negotiations with the Egyptians which would result in the withdrawal of troops. It was only … Continue reading