Lord Byron: An Uncommon Hero (by Craig Molus)

In this essay I shall attempt to discuss, very briefly, the life of the poet George Gordon Byron, sixth Lord Byron (b. 1788–d. 1824), and his two seminal works: Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and Don Juan along with Hours of Idleness … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 4, by Valentin Boulan)

Chapter Three: On the importance of Group Dynamics Studies about troop motivations have often been subject to a heated two sided debate, concerned by whether broad ideas or group dynamics within regiments themselves played a greater role in galvanising soldiers. … Continue reading

How did Idi Amin Dada lead a successful coup in 1971? (Part 2, by William Miles)

The second strand I wish to analyse is that of the conditions in Uganda prior to the coup itself. For a successful coup, there must be discontent amongst the people of the nation and a desire for change. “Surtaxes have … Continue reading

Who won the Vietnam war? (by Joshua Arbury)

Between the end of World War II and 1975 Vietnam was in almost continual conflict, firstly against the French for independence, and then in a civil war that expanded to involve (to some extent) the major superpowers of the world: … Continue reading

How did Idi Amin Dada lead a successful coup in 1971? (Part 1, by William Miles)

Obote’s actions on the 24th January 1971 set in motion the coup d’etat which was to bring Amin to power. On this evening, Obote, realising that he must contain Amin, called up the officer’s mess at Jinja barracks to order … Continue reading

Did the British government have any intention on giving the Arabs a state of their own after the First World War? (by Mr Charrington)

British policy in the Middle East prior to the outbreak of WWI was certainly complicated; but it has also been misunderstood in historiography. True, reputation was against the British government – the Empire was perhaps at its most powerful, governing … Continue reading

To what extent did the populations of rural Lithuania and Poland engage in hostilities and Nazi collaboration against Jewish fugitives and partisans surviving in forests? (Part 2, by Jack Watt)

Traditional anti-Semitism was rife in pre-war Eastern Europe and was not a recent phenomenon. Yehuda Merin asserts that ‘most of the local population harboured feelings of hatred for the Jews in the family camps… well-rooted in past ages.’ This was … Continue reading

Motivating the citizen soldiers: French troops and the Revolutionary Wars 1792-1802 (Part 3, by Valentin Boulan)

Chapter Two: ‘Dedicated body and soul to the cause they served ’ According to Robben, fighting motivations can be divided into two broad categories: the original motivations to enlist, determined by the pre-war context as discussed in Chapter One, and … Continue reading